A SHORT EVALUATION ON THE ESTABLISHMENT, FUNCTIONING, AND TRIAL PROCEDURES OF THE EASTERN INDEPENDENCE COURT


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Unat K.

ATATÜRK YOLU DERGİSİ, no.74, pp.215-225, 2024 (Peer-Reviewed Journal)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.46955/ankuayd.1475785
  • Journal Name: ATATÜRK YOLU DERGİSİ
  • Journal Indexes: Historical Abstracts, ERIHPlus, TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.215-225
  • Ankara University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

The Independence Courts, which carried out trials within the framework of ensuring the authority of the Grand National Assembly of Turkey (GNAT) during the years of the War of Independence, continued their activities to ensure the establishment of the Turkish Revolution after the adoption of the Republican regime. As a matter of fact, in an environment where conflicts about developments such as the abolition of the Sultanate, the proclamation of the Republic and the abolition of the Caliphate deepened, the Sheikh Said Rebellion, which led to the establishment of the Eastern Independence Court, broke out. Fethi (Okyar), who was criticized for being passive in taking measures against the rebellion, resigned and İsmet (İnönü) Pasha was appointed to form the new government. On March 4, 1925, when the new government was formed, the Takrir-i Sükûn Law which gave extraordinary powers to the government, was passed by the Parliament. After the approval of the Takrir-i Sükûn Law, the government's proposal to establish two separate Independence Courts, one in Ankara and the other in the rebellion zone, was also accepted. On March 7, 1925, the election of the president, prosecutor and member was held for both Independence Courts by the Turkish Grand National Assembly. As a result of the election, Hacim Muhiddin (Çarıklı) became the President of the Eastern Independence Court, Ahmed Süreyya Örgeevren became the Prosecutor, Ali Saib (Ursavaş) , Avni (Doğan) and Lütfi Müfid (Özdeş) set off to Diyarbakır on 12 April 1925 and started their work. The court, according to the Law of Takrir-i Sükûn, was going to make judgements about reaction, rebellion, movements and publications that wanted to disrupt the peace and security of the country. The Eastern Independence Court, which continued its duty by travelling around the region, especially in Diyarbakır, Elazığ, Malatya and Urfa, had the authority to implement its decisions. The task of the Eastern Independence Court, which continued its activities for around two years with six-month extensions, was terminated with the Assembly Decision dated March 7, 1927.